OPW, poetry

OPW: Max Ehrmann’s “Desiderata”

There's a large soft spot in my heart for broad and sweeping pieces of advice about how to live you life. Even if I don't agree with everything such poems, columns, commencement speeches, or songs say, I still like them. And even if they seem to be off on a few points, they say things that are probably worth listening to. Such is the case with today's "Other People's Words," Max Ehrmann's poem "Desiderata."

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world

The Serenity Prayer

When you look around at the world, it's easy to be angry. There are socio-political problems all over: Darfur, Myanmar, Iraq, China, Zimbabwe, North Korea, Somalia... the list could go on and on. There are also the scourges of poverty and hunger that never seem to leave us. And the more mundane but pervasive problems of theft, violence, and murder. And this is not even to mention the lower-key but no less troubling problems of racism, (hetero-)sexism, ageism, religious intolerance, general carelessness, ignorance, and outright selfishness. In short, "man's inhumanity to man."

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OPW, religion

OPW: The Dilemma of Belief

Today's "Other People's Worlds" is about the age-old question of belief versus atheism. It's also a rather oddly cited quote, for which I apologize. It comes from the philosopher William James's "The Will to Believe," one of the most famous Christian apologetics. In it, James argues that belief (in God) is a choice that one must make, and by equating agnosticism with atheism, he says there are essentially two choices. As an apologist, James argued in favor of belief.

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big ideas, politics, religion

The Problem of Heaven and Earth

This idea arose from something E. O. Wilson, the famous biologist, recently told Bill Moyers. He was essentially giving reasons that people, in this case Christians, use for not concerning themselves with the impact of human activity on the planet and other species. I hope I can lay out the argument with some clarity, separate from the rest of what Wilson was saying.

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